Tonnelle Tire Bloghttp://tonnelletire.com/blogMost recent posts.Wed, 12 Dec 2018 17:36:08 -0500en-ushourly1John Bean launches automated diagnostic wheel balancerhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/john-bean-launches-automated-diagnostic-wheel-balancerhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/john-bean-launches-automated-diagnostic-wheel-balancer#commentsWed, 12 Dec 2018 17:36:08 -0500Sonu http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/john-bean-launches-automated-diagnostic-wheel-balancer<p id="" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 0px 0px 1.5em; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> CONWAY, Ariz. (Dec. 9, 2016) &mdash; Snap On Inc.&#39;s John Bean brand has introduced an automated diagnostic wheel balancing system that the company claims is the first of its kind.</p> <p id="" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> Using laser mapping and a high-resolution 3-D model of the tire, the John Bean B2000P takes hundreds of thousands of measurement points and creates a topographical image of the tire tread and sidewall that shows depth, wear and abnormalities. The technology, Snap On said, mimics that used by tire manufacturers in industrial settings.</p> <p id="" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> The John Bean B2000P also features the company&#39;s patented Opti-Line pull correction, which eliminates the need for multiple tire rotations, thus reducing the time required for road tests, Snap On claims.</p> <p id="" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> &quot;The automatic data entry by the John Bean 2000P removes the chance for error and inaccurate results,&quot; Adam Brown, product manager for John Bean said in a news release. &quot;When combined with precise wheel balancing, the Runout Force Vectoring (RFV) diagnostics ensure uniformity based total ride quality.&quot;</p> <p id="" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> Additional information about this and other wheel service products is available online at&nbsp;<strong style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"><a href="http://www.johnbean.com/default.asp" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); cursor: pointer; color: rgb(0, 149, 67); text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">www.johnbean.com</a></strong>&nbsp;or by calling 877-482-4866.</p> /blog/view/john-bean-launches-automated-diagnostic-wheel-balancer/feed0TIA to offer hands-on OTR, ag tire traininghttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/tia-to-offer-hands-on-otr-ag-tire-traininghttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/tia-to-offer-hands-on-otr-ag-tire-training#commentsSat, 02 Dec 2017 19:32:09 -0500Sonu http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/tia-to-offer-hands-on-otr-ag-tire-training<p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 0px 0px 1.5em; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> BOWIE, Md. (Nov. 28, 2016) &mdash; The Tire Industry Association (TIA) will offer six advanced hands-on training courses in 2017 for technicians in the earthmover and farm tire service industries.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> With support from AME International, Stellar Industries Inc. and Fuller Brothers Inc.&rsquo;s Tire Life, attendees will receive comprehensive training using a service truck and hydraulic tools during the three-day classes, TIA said.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> &ldquo;Nothing replaces hands-on instruction in the farm and earthmover tire service industries, so these classes are a direct response to the demand from our members to provide these unique training classes,&rdquo; said Kevin Rohlwing, TIA senior vice president of training.</p> <div class="desktop-hidden" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> &nbsp;</div> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> &ldquo;While classroom instruction and a written examination is necessary in most instances, these classes are not part of a certification or certificate program, so all of the focus is on using the tools and equipment safely and correctly.&rdquo;</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> Registrants will be required to complete TIA&rsquo;s Basic Level ETS or FTS courses as a prerequisite. Tuition for the hands-on training courses is $495 for one or two attendees, while companies sending three or more participants will pay a discounted rate of $445 per student.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> The class schedule for earthmover tire service classes in 2017 is as follows:</p> <div class="desktop-hidden" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> April 18-20 at AME International in Brooksville, Fla.;</li> </ul> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> Aug. 8-10 at Stellar Industries in Garner, Iowa; and</li> </ul> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> Sept. 12-14 at Stellar Industries in Garner.</li> </ul> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> The class schedule for farm tire service classes is as follows:</p> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> Jan. 17-19 at AME International in Brooksville;</li> </ul> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> June 12-15 at Stellar Industries in Garner; and</li> </ul> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); list-style-position: inside; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);"> July 11-13 at Stellar Industries in Garner.</li> </ul> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); margin: 1.5em 0px; line-height: 1.5em; color: rgb(77, 77, 77); font-family: &quot;Source Sans Pro&quot;, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; background-color: rgb(242, 242, 242);"> For more information or to register, contact Christine Hoogenboom at&nbsp;<a href="mailto:choogenboom@tireindustry.org" style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); cursor: pointer; color: rgb(0, 149, 67); text-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; outline: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);">choogenboom@tireindustry.org</strong></a>&nbsp;or by calling 800-876-8372, extension 106.</p> /blog/view/tia-to-offer-hands-on-otr-ag-tire-training/feed0DOC: 40% Tariffs Due on Truck Tires From Chinahttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/doc-40-tariffs-due-on-truck-tires-from-chinahttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/doc-40-tariffs-due-on-truck-tires-from-china#commentsMon, 02 Oct 2017 10:15:38 -0400Sonu http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/doc-40-tariffs-due-on-truck-tires-from-china<div class="story-heading wrapper-side" style="margin: 0px auto 25px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; overflow: hidden; width: 830px; max-width: 830px; text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: proxima-nova, helvetica, arial, san-serif; font-size: medium;"> <h3> DOC: 40% Tariffs Due on Truck Tires From China</h3> <h1> &nbsp;</h1> <p> &nbsp;</p> <div class="about" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-size: 16px; line-height: 1em; overflow: hidden; display: inline-block;"> &nbsp;</div> <div class="about" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-size: 16px; line-height: 1em; overflow: hidden; display: inline-block;"> &nbsp;</div> <p> &nbsp;</p> <div class="about" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-size: 16px; line-height: 1em; overflow: hidden; display: inline-block;"> &nbsp;</div> <p> &nbsp;</p> <div class="about" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-size: 16px; line-height: 1em; overflow: hidden; display: inline-block;"> &nbsp;</div> <div class="about" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-size: 16px; line-height: 1em; overflow: hidden; display: inline-block;"> <h1> <span style="font-size:16px;"><a class="social-coloricon-facebook ui-link" href="https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/715161/tariffs-on-truck-and-bus-tires-from-china-will-be-about-40" style="color: rgb(119, 119, 119); text-indent: 100%; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; width: 27px; height: 27px; display: inline-block; margin: 0px 2px; background-image: url(&quot;../content/images/sprite-main.png&quot;); background-size: 600px 600px; background-position: -300px -25px; background-repeat: no-repeat;" target="_blank">Facebook</a>&nbsp;<a class="social-coloricon-twitter ui-link" href="https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?hashtags=DOC,Tariffs,TBR-tariff,&amp;original_referer=http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/715161/tariffs-on-truck-and-bus-tires-from-china-will-be-about-40&amp;text=DOC:%2040%%20Tariffs%20Due%20on%20Truck%20Tires%20From%20China%20-%20Modern%20Tire%20Dealer&amp;tw_p=tweetbutton&amp;url=http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/715161/tariffs-on-truck-and-bus-tires-from-china-will-be-about-40&amp;via=MTDMagazine" style="color: rgb(119, 119, 119); text-indent: 100%; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; width: 27px; height: 27px; display: inline-block; margin: 0px 2px; background-image: url(&quot;../content/images/sprite-main.png&quot;); background-size: 600px 600px; background-position: -350px -25px; background-repeat: no-repeat;" target="_blank">Twitter</a>&nbsp;<a class="social-coloricon-google ui-link" href="https://plus.google.com/share?url=http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/715161/tariffs-on-truck-and-bus-tires-from-china-will-be-about-40" style="color: rgb(119, 119, 119); text-indent: 100%; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; width: 27px; height: 27px; display: inline-block; margin: 0px 2px; background-image: url(&quot;../content/images/sprite-main.png&quot;); background-size: 600px 600px; background-position: -400px -25px; background-repeat: no-repeat;" target="_blank">Google+</a>&nbsp;<a class="social-coloricon-email ui-link" href="mailto: ?subject=DOC:%2040%%20Tariffs%20Due%20on%20Truck%20Tires%20From%20China%20-%20Modern%20Tire%20Dealer&amp;body=I%20thought%20you%20would%20find%20this%20story%20useful.%20It%20is%20from%20Modern%20Tire%20Dealer.%20http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/715161/tariffs-on-truck-and-bus-tires-from-china-will-be-about-40" style="color: rgb(119, 119, 119); text-indent: 100%; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; width: 27px; height: 27px; display: inline-block; margin: 0px 2px; background-image: url(&quot;../content/images/sprite-main.png&quot;); background-size: 600px 600px; background-position: -450px -25px; background-repeat: no-repeat;">Mail</a></span></h1> <h1> <span style="font-size:16px;">Posted on August 29, 2016</span></h1> </div> </div> <div class="left" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; float: left; overflow: hidden; width: 740px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: proxima-nova, helvetica, arial, san-serif; font-size: medium;"> <div class="story wrapper-side" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); line-height: 27.9px; font-size: 18px;"> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) says truck and bus tire manufacturers in China are dumping tires in the U.S. at less than fair market value, and those tires should be subject to tariffs of at least 20%. The tariffs are retroactive.</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> &nbsp;</p> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Chinese truck and bus tires are benefitting from government subsidies and dumping in the U.S., the DOC has found in its preliminary investigations. The DOC&#39;s final ruling is expected Jan. 17, 2017.</span></span></div> <p> &nbsp;</p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="story-image story-image-left" style="overflow: hidden; margin-bottom: 15px; float: left; margin-right: 30px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="Chinese truck and bus tires are benefitting from government subsidies and dumping in the U.S., the DOC has found in its preliminary investigations. The DOC's final ruling is expected Jan. 17, 2017." class="wrapImageCMS" src="http://images.moderntiredealer.com/post/M-TBR-tires-at-Redwood-General-Tire-1.JPG" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; max-height: 540px; max-width: 100%; float: right; height: 133px; width: 200px;" /></span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> <caption align="bottom" class="image-caption" style="color: rgb(153, 153, 153); font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.5em; text-align: left; margin: 0px 0px 5px; padding: 0px;"> &nbsp;</caption> </table> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The DOC announced its preliminary results Aug. 29, 2016.</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In every tariff investigation, the DOC selects manufacturers to serve as mandatory respondents. Those companies then provide data and answer questions, and those figures and answers serve as the basis and gauge for the industry as a whole. Other manufacturers also may volunteer to provide their own data throughout the investigation as well.</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">In the truck and bus tire investigation, Prinx Chengshan (Shandong) Tire Co. Ltd. and Double Coin Holdings Ltd. were the mandatory respondents.</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Here are the rates:</span></span></p> <table style="height: 78px;" width="635"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Tire manufacturer</strong></span></span></td> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Rate</strong></span></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Prinx Chengshan</strong></span></span></td> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>&nbsp;20.87%</strong></span></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Non-selected separate rate respondents</strong></span></span></td> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>&nbsp;20.87%</strong></span></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Rate for all other manufacturers in China</strong></span></span></td> <td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>&nbsp;22.57%</strong></span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Commerce preliminarily found Double Coin &ldquo;is not eligible for a separate rate and is part of the China-wide entity.&rdquo;</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The higher rate for the other manufacturers in China is &ldquo;due to their failure to respond to Commerce&rsquo;s requests for information.&rdquo;</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The DOC says there was evidence that truck and bus tires were dumped in the U.S. soon after the United Steelworkers sought the investigation in January, and as a result the U.S. Customs and Border Protection will be instructed to retroactively impose the tariffs on products. The effective date will be 90 days prior to the forthcoming publication of this preliminary determination in the Federal Register. (It usually takes about a week for the Federal Register notice to be published, so the tariff retroactive date likely will be around June 7.)</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">These anti-dumping tariffs are on top of the countervailing tariffs the DOC preliminarily approved in June. Adding the two tariffs together determines the full penalty. For Double Coin, for example, it&#39;s 39.63%.&nbsp;<a class="ui-link" href="http://www.moderntiredealer.com/news/714099/doc-chinese-truck-tires-are-subject-to-tariffs" style="color: rgb(54, 93, 183); text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Review the countervailing tariff details here</a>.</span></span></p> <blockquote style="font-style: italic !important; color: rgb(218, 9, 9) !important; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; overflow: hidden !important;"> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.5em !important; font-size: 1.3em !important;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">For most manufacturers, the combined rate will be above 40%.&nbsp;</span></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; line-height: 27.9px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The DOC cites U.S. Census Bureau data and says 8.9 million truck and bus tires were imported into the U.S. from China in 2015. Those tires are valued at more than $1 billion.</span></span></p> </div> <div class="wrapper-side" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; overflow: hidden;"> <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 10px; border: 0px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); line-height: 27.9px; font-size: 18px;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Related Topics:</strong>&nbsp;<a class="ui-link" href="http://www.moderntiredealer.com/tag/41516/doc" style="color: rgb(54, 93, 183); text-decoration: none;">DOC</a>,&nbsp;<a class="ui-link" href="http://www.moderntiredealer.com/tag/31213/tariffs" style="color: rgb(54, 93, 183); text-decoration: none;">tariffs</a>,&nbsp;<a class="ui-link" href="http://www.moderntiredealer.com/tag/60639/tbr-tariff" style="color: rgb(54, 93, 183); text-decoration: none;">TBR tariff</a></span></span></p> </div> </div> /blog/view/doc-40-tariffs-due-on-truck-tires-from-china/feed0RIGHT TIRE PRESSURE TIPShttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/right-tire-pressure-tipshttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/right-tire-pressure-tips#commentsWed, 31 May 2017 16:08:00 -0400Sonu http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/right-tire-pressure-tips<h1 class="article-title" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 36px; margin: 0px 0px 44px; font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-weight: 400; line-height: 44px; color: rgb(29, 33, 39); letter-spacing: -1px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">THE RIGHT TIRE PRESSURE: WHY THE MAXIMUM ISN&rsquo;T THE BEST</span></h1> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">It can be heard from a lot of drivers who ask if they should be inflating their tires according to the maximum PSI (pounds per square inch) listed on the sidewall. However, when it comes to the right tire pressure, the maximum is not the optimum.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">For smooth, safe rides and long-lasting tires, it&rsquo;s important to find the right tire pressure for your vehicle.</span></p> <h2 style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-weight: 300; line-height: 40px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); margin: 0px 0px 32px; font-size: 30px; letter-spacing: -1px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">THE MAXIMUM</span></h2> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Somewhere on the sidewall of your tire, just below the big, bold letters of the manufacturer, for example, you might have noticed the words &lsquo;Max. Press. 35 PSI.&rsquo; That number tells you the maximum cold pressure needed for your tire to carry its maximum load.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">We mention &lsquo;cold&rsquo; pressure because that means you&rsquo;re filling up your tires at the ideal time&mdash;when they&rsquo;re cold. First thing in the morning or after sitting for a few hours in the shade is best.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Usually, your tire&rsquo;s maximum tire pressure is somewhere between 30 and 32 PSI.</span></p> <h3 style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-weight: 400; line-height: 32px; color: rgb(29, 33, 39); margin: 0px 0px 33px; font-size: 25px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">What happens if you inflate your tires to the max PSI?</span></h3> <ul style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; line-height: 24px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">The handling characteristics change</strong><br style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;" /> Since tires inflated to the max can&rsquo;t give as much on the sidewall, you might see superior cornering, but it could be at the risk of your braking threshold. One quick corner and your back end could slide out.</span></li> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; line-height: 24px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">The life of your tire decreases</strong>. When your tires are inflated too much, the rubber rounds out at the top of the tire when you&rsquo;re driving, and the center will quickly wear out. You&rsquo;ll also reduce your traction and you could even cause a blowout. Check out our post on avoiding blowouts.</span></li> </ul> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">So, what&rsquo;s the right tire pressure for your vehicle?</strong></span></p> <h2 style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-weight: 300; line-height: 40px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); margin: 0px 0px 32px; font-size: 30px; letter-spacing: -1px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">THE OPTIMUM</span></h2> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">You&rsquo;ll find the manufacturer&rsquo;s optimum or recommended tire pressure for your car on a sticker in the door jam, or in your owner&rsquo;s manual. Some models even place the stickers on the trunk lid, in the console or on the fuel door.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Recommended pressure is usually between 30 and 35 PSI. That number indicates the minimum amount of air pressure needed to support your vehicle&rsquo;s maximum load-carrying capacity. Any less, and you&rsquo;ll see poor fuel economy and handling as well as premature wear from too much flexing and tire overloading.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 20px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">When your tires are inflated to the recommended PSI, you enjoy their optimum life and performance.</span></p> <h2 style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-weight: 300; line-height: 40px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); margin: 0px 0px 32px; font-size: 30px; letter-spacing: -1px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px;">INFLATING YOUR TIRES</span></h2> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; line-height: inherit; color: rgb(119, 119, 119); font-family: &quot;Open Sans&quot;; font-size: 16px;"> <span style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 0px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">When&rsquo;s the best time to check your tire pressure? A few good rules of thumb are: every time you fill up for gas, every 10 degree change in temperature, or every 30 days.</span></p> /blog/view/right-tire-pressure-tips/feed0Mixing Tires – Bad Ideahttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/mixing-tires-bad-ideahttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/mixing-tires-bad-idea#commentsThu, 25 Feb 2016 07:52:10 -0500http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/mixing-tires-bad-idea<p> In a perfect world, all four tires would wear out at the same time. In the same perfect world, everyone would be able to afford a whole set of tires all at once. Unfortunately, things often just do not work out that way.&nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/216/mixing tires.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 225px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 3px 10px; float: right;" /></p> <div> <p> Sometimes you may just have to replace tires as you can afford them, one or two at a time, but there are some important things to bear in mind if you have to do that.&nbsp;</p> <div> <p> If you can only afford to replace one or two tires, it&rsquo;s essential that you go with tires that are identical (or at least as close as possible) to the car&rsquo;s remaining tires. That means that internal construction, size, tread pattern and design should be close to the same. Don&rsquo;t mix winter tires with all-season tires, don&rsquo;t mix run-flat tires with standard tires, for instance. But why?</p> <p> Tires are all designed for different handling properties and traction, and are intended to work together as a set. Mixing sizes, tread patterns and designs can mean a car that has unpredictable, jittery, &ldquo;squirrelly&rdquo; handling, braking and roadholding properties, and that can be downright dangerous in a panic stop or other emergency situation.</p> <p> If you have to replace a pair of tires and decide on the same brand and model as the others, the new tires should go on the rear. That might seem counterintuitive to some, but consider this; if you mount the new tires on the front and end up on wet pavement, the new tires will easily disperse the water while the rear tires can hydroplane.</p> <p> Remember that the minimum tread depth for tires, by state law, is 2/32&rdquo;. At 2/32&rdquo;, you should be able to plainly see the wear bars that are molded at a right angle in the base of the tread grooves. If you&rsquo;re in doubt, insert a penny into the tread grooves, Lincoln head down. If the tread reaches the top of Lincoln&rsquo;s head, your tread is 2/32&rdquo; deep. Try again with a quarter &ndash; does the tread reach the top of Washington&rsquo;s head? That&rsquo;s a depth of 4/32&rdquo;. One more time with a penny&hellip;if the tread reaches the Lincoln Memorial, your tread is 6/32&rdquo; deep.</p> <p> If you&rsquo;re thinking it might be time for a set of tires, don&rsquo;t put it off&hellip;make an appointment and see what kind of price we can make you on a set of premium-brand tires.</p> </div> </div> /blog/view/mixing-tires-bad-idea/feed0Get The Most Out Of That Set Of Tireshttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/get-the-most-out-of-that-set-of-tireshttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/get-the-most-out-of-that-set-of-tires#commentsThu, 28 Jan 2016 13:08:46 -0500http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/get-the-most-out-of-that-set-of-tires<div> Your tires are a pretty big investment. Even with the cheapest set of tires, you&rsquo;re going to be spending upwards of $400 on the tires, mounting, balancing, disposal fees and taxes. Since you laid down that kind of money, doesn&rsquo;t it just make sense to make sure you get the most miles possible out of them?&nbsp;</div> <div> Here&rsquo;s some advice on long tire life:</div> <div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/214/Blog2.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 14px 10px; float: right;" /></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Regularly check your tire pressure. This one is really, really important. Underinflated tires will wear&nbsp;</div> <div> <div> unevenly and reduce your fuel economy due to increased rolling resistance. That increased rolling resistance also means more heat, which will break down the tires&rsquo; internal structure and shorten their lives. All it takes to shorten a tire&rsquo;s service life by 25 percent is for it to be underinflated by 5-6 lbs.&nbsp;</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Rotate your tires regularly. No vehicle has even weight distribution from front to rear. The engine puts more weight over the front wheels; in addition, the front tires will wear differently as the vehicle&rsquo;s weight and momentum shifts to the front while braking. The front tires are also subjected to different forces while cornering. As a result, it&rsquo;s important to rotate the tires, shifting their positions on the vehicle to even out wear. Rotations should be done every 6,000 miles or so; many drivers have the rotation performed at the same time as an oil change, since the vehicle&rsquo;s already up on a lift anyway.&nbsp;</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Check your wheel alignment. A vehicle that&rsquo;s in need of a wheel alignment will wear the front tires unevenly, as the out-of-spec wheel tries to drag the car in a different direction. That&rsquo;s what also causes the persistent pull to one side while driving in a straight line. Be alert to the signs of poor wheel alignment, and have an alignment performed if necessary.&nbsp;</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Drive sensibly. That means no hard cornering and no wheel spin while taking off.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> /blog/view/get-the-most-out-of-that-set-of-tires/feed0Don’t Forget Your Sparehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/don-t-forget-your-sparehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/don-t-forget-your-spare#commentsThu, 29 Oct 2015 12:19:28 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/don-t-forget-your-spare<div> Oh, the lowly spare tire. It doesn&rsquo;t get much respect.&nbsp;</div> <div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/204/october-2.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 225px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 14px 10px; float: right;" /></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Today, a lot of vehicles don&rsquo;t even come with a spare tire anymore, not even the little &ldquo;donut&rdquo; space-saver spare. Instead, to cut weight and free up space, they come with a compressor and a can of a Fix-a-Flat-style product in hopes that you can get back on your way again. Great idea, unless your tire has a sidewall puncture or is shredded&hellip;</div> <div> <div> Anyway, if your car is equipped with a spare, you shouldn&rsquo;t just ignore it. Tires have a shelf life, and time will take its toll on any tire, including ones that are never on the ground. Even brand-new tires have a sell-by date; the industry agrees that tires that are older than six to eight years old are probably unsafe due to degradation of the rubber. Your spare can sit in the trunk or under the vehicle and dry-rot over time, and even if it doesn&rsquo;t, it can lose air to the point where it&rsquo;s useless.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> If your vehicle has a full-size spare, it&rsquo;s a good idea to include it in the tire rotation schedule, actually putting it on the pavement from time to time. If not, at least check on the poor old lowly spare and let it know that someone cares about it. The alternative, after all, is being stuck by the side of the road with a flat tire and a flat, worthless spare both.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> /blog/view/don-t-forget-your-spare/feed0Are All-Season Tires Really All-Season? http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/are-all-season-tires-really-all-seasonhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/are-all-season-tires-really-all-season#commentsFri, 11 Sep 2015 11:21:18 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/are-all-season-tires-really-all-season<div> We frequently get questions about all-season tires when consumers are trying to make the right purchasing decision for &nbsp;a set of new tires. As the title of the blog asks&hellip;&rdquo;are all-season tires really all-season?&rdquo;</div> <div> <div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> The answer is: it that depends on what part of the country you&rsquo;re living in.</div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/201/Sep Blog1.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 212px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 16px 10px; float: right;" /> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <div> <div> All-season tires are a compromise from the very start. They&rsquo;re designed for a forgiving ride, low noise, decent handling and good road manners. Maybe not as much as what a good set of grand touring tires can deliver, but pretty respectable&hellip;and also with an aggressive tread pattern which&nbsp;</div> </div> <div> <div> channels water away from the tire&rsquo;s contact patch for wet-weather traction. All-season tires also have a network of sipes, tiny slits which provide hundreds of extra biting edges to dig in and provide traction in light snow or slush. Their tread compounds are designed to stay flexible in a wide range of temperatures. All in all, if your area has no more than a few inches of snow every year, chances are you can do just fine with all-season tires.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Winter tires, on the other hand, are designed for the sort of winter weather you might see in New England or the upper Midwest &ndash; lots of snow and very cold temperatures. They&rsquo;ve come a long way from the heavy, clunky &ldquo;snow tires&rdquo; or &ldquo;mud grips&rdquo; which might have been on your dad&rsquo;s station wagon, but they still feature deep tread grooves and a tread design that&rsquo;s intended for real winter conditions. Winter tires use a tread formulation that stays flexible at low temperatures for traction, but they shouldn&rsquo;t be used when temperatures get above 40 degrees. In warmer temperatures, winter tires are notorious for premature wear, heavy handling properties and noise. Still, they&rsquo;re good for slush and snow-packed roads, or even light icy conditions. Some snow tires are available pre-drilled for studs for traction in nasty weather. In heavier ice conditions, no tire does well and you should probably just avoid driving altogether.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Summer tires, on the other hand, are intended for warmer temperatures and feature a soft, &ldquo;sticky&rdquo; rubber formulation which offers great traction on wet or dry pavement. They&rsquo;re pretty close in design and tread compound to performance or ultra-high-performance tires; their down side is they shouldn&rsquo;t be used in temperatures below 50 degrees, and usually do not carry the same lengthy tread wear warranty of touring or all-season tires.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> So, to answer the question.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Are all-season tires really all-season? If you live in areas that have a moderately tough winter with some wintry precipitation, the answer will probably be yes. All-season radials are a good enough fit for most drivers that many new cars come equipped with them.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Got questions? Thinking it might be time for a set of all-season tires for your car? Give us a call and let one of our service advisors set up an appointment for you!&nbsp;</div> </div> </div> /blog/view/are-all-season-tires-really-all-season/feed0Do Your Homework on Tire Safetyhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/do-your-homework-on-tire-safetyhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/do-your-homework-on-tire-safety#commentsThu, 13 Aug 2015 11:16:35 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/do-your-homework-on-tire-safety<div> We see it all the time&hellip;people tend to not think about their tires until something goes wrong. Sometimes, this can mean sitting on the side of the road waiting for help, and other times it can mean more serious consequences. Here are a few things to remember for tire safety as the summer winds down and back-to-school season starts.</div> <p> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/199/AugBlog1.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 216px; float: right; margin: 3px 10px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid;" /></p> <div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Check your tire pressure regularly. This one is really important. Your car&rsquo;s tires will lose air through the valve over time, and an underinflated tire will hurt fuel economy due to added rolling resistance. Low tires also affect handling and will generate enough heat that they can shorten the tire&rsquo;s lifespan. Get a quality tire gauge (the dial type, not the pencil type) and check the inflation of all four tires once a month. Make sure to check inflation while the tires are cold, and inflate them to the manufacturer&rsquo;s specifications. Tire inflation levels can be found on a sticker, either under the hood, on the driver&rsquo;s door jamb or inside the fuel filler lid.&nbsp;</div> </div> <div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <div> <div> &bull; Don&rsquo;t mix tires. If you have a tire which fails altogether and can afford to only replace that tire, make sure it&rsquo;s the same size and tread pattern as the rest, and preferably the same brand. It&rsquo;s best to replace all four tires at once, or at least in pairs. Mixing sizes and designs of tires can result in a vehicle that&rsquo;s never going to drive, handle or ride correctly.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &bull; Rotate your tires regularly. No vehicle has even weight distribution from front to rear, and front tires will always be subject to more wear due to cornering and braking forces. Switching the positions of the tires regularly ensures even wear and long tire life. Tires should be rotated at 5,000 mile intervals; since oil changes should also fall at around the same interval, it&rsquo;s easy enough to just schedule them both for the same appointment.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &bull; Inspect your tires&rsquo; tread depth. 2/32&rdquo; is considered the minimum safe tread depth in most states. Here&rsquo;s an easy way to check that: take a penny and insert it into the tread grooves, Lincoln&rsquo;s head down. If you can see any portion of the top of Lincoln&rsquo;s head, you&rsquo;re below minimum tread depth. Now, try the same test with a quarter. Can you see the top of Washington&rsquo;s head? You&rsquo;re below 4/32&rdquo; tread depth. Insert the penny into the tread again &ndash; if the rubber reaches the Lincoln Memorial, your tread depth is under 6/32&rdquo;.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &bull; Inspect the tires&rsquo; condition. Look closely for damage or foreign objects. Examine the tires closely for uneven wear and run your hand along the tread surface to feel for irregularities; any of these could indicate alignment or suspension problems.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Don&rsquo;t let tires be one more thing for you to worry about as you shuttle the kids back and forth to school. Got any questions, or feel like maybe it&rsquo;s time to just break down and buy another set of tires? Make an appointment with us and let us help you out.&nbsp;</div> </div> /blog/view/do-your-homework-on-tire-safety/feed0Seven Things You Need To Know About Tireshttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/seven-things-you-need-to-know-about-tireshttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/seven-things-you-need-to-know-about-tires#commentsFri, 31 Jul 2015 12:09:50 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/seven-things-you-need-to-know-about-tires<p> We often see customers who are a little overwhelmed by the tire buying process. There are so many types of tires for different vehicles and different driving styles, all at different price points. Here are a few things every driver needs to know about tires:</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/198/july-photo-2.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; float: right; border-width: 2px; border-style: solid; margin-left: 2px; margin-right: 2px;" /></p> <p> &middot; &nbsp; A tire is constructed from the inside out, starting at the inner liner. There are 20 to 25 different components in every tire; fabric belts are wrapped around the inner liner, with steel belts, more fabric belts and other materials layered between the tread surface and the inner liner. These layers provide strength, noise suppression and ride quality.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp; Newer low-profile tires are popular with many drivers, if only for aesthetic/style reasons. It&rsquo;s important to know low-profile tires may handle better and offer better steering response and cornering performance, but they will also have a harsher ride quality than traditional designs with taller, softer sidewalls.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp; Along with budget, think about your driving style and expectations. Do you prefer a quiet, smooth-riding tire? If so, grand touring or touring tires may be the way to go. Do you like better performance? Consider summer or UHP tires, but remember they will also wear faster than all-season or touring tires. Do you anticipate driving in light winter weather? All-season tires may be a great fit.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp;Remember your vehicle left the factory with a certain size of wheel and tire, and the car&rsquo;s handling, steering response, braking performance and ride quality were all tuned for that specific size. Changing anything in that equation should be done carefully. &nbsp;You&rsquo;re better off in most cases staying with manufacturer&rsquo;s recommendations for tire and wheel sizes.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp;Gas prices may fluctuate, but they are probably never going to be cheap again. Tires are an important part of fuel economy, and some industry experts contend drivers can see as much as a 15-20 percent difference in fuel economy depending on which tires they select. Low-rolling-resistance tires continue to evolve and improve&hellip;and of course, proper inflation to recommended air pressure is crucial to fuel economy.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp;If you drive a light truck, be mindful of how you&rsquo;re going to use that truck. The tire&rsquo;s load rating is important if you expect to haul heavy loads or do any towing. Also consider how often you might want to leave the pavement &ndash; many all-terrain tires are good for light off-road use while still offering a civilized ride and road manners.</p> <p> &middot; &nbsp;Tires are still a &ldquo;you get what you pay for&rdquo; proposition. Don&rsquo;t get us wrong, there are plenty of great-quality tires at lower price points, but tires that seem too good to be true price-wise, usually are. Do your due diligence in looking up consumer reviews and ratings before making your decision. And of course, our service advisors will always be happy to help point you in the right direction.</p> <p> We hope this helps a little in your tire buying process &ndash; if it&rsquo;s time to get some new tires on your vehicle, make an appointment and we&rsquo;ll be happy to get you set up.&nbsp;</p> /blog/view/seven-things-you-need-to-know-about-tires/feed0Is it Time for a Tire Rotation? http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/is-it-time-for-a-tire-rotationhttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/is-it-time-for-a-tire-rotation#commentsThu, 28 Aug 2014 10:58:50 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/is-it-time-for-a-tire-rotation<p> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/174/AugustFAll2014_Blog_2.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 185px; border-width: 1px; border-style: solid; margin: 10px; float: right;" />Tire rotation is an easy maintenance item that has long term benefits for any vehicle. When properly maintained, tire rotations can improve fuel economy, extend tire life and provide drivers better handling through improved stability. Frequently servicing vehicles with tire rotations is imperative to sustaining tire tread by ensuring all tires are used evenly without excessive wear to one section or another.</p> <p> Normal tread wear is unavoidable due to uneven vehicle weight dispersal, vehicle performance, etc. Without tire rotations, tires continue to wear on the same areas over and over, causing irreversible damage to tire tread which drastically decreases tire life. Engine weight accounts for a major portion of vehicle weight, causing front tires to wear significantly faster than back tires. Front tires also take all responsibilities for steering, turning and receiving first impact with any objects on the road.</p> <p> However, some causes of uneven tire wear result from other mechanical issues existing in the vehicle. When not aligned properly, tires tend to drag or wear irregularly. When experiencing symptoms such as the vehicle pulling to the left or to the right, vibration, or road noise coming from the tires, the vehicle should be taken to an automotive technician quickly for diagnosis and repair. The diagnosis could include misalignment, front end suspension wear, etc. Repair is crucial to the life of the tire and the longevity and safety of the vehicle. Lastly, check tire pressure often, as having incorrect tire pressure will decrease fuel economy and destroy treads.</p> <p> Servicing vehicles with frequent tire rotations is one step that is both simple and inexpensive to provide a dramatic positive impact on the future of any vehicle. Improve overall performance and save money on future auto repairs and tire replacements by spending only a few minutes to have a tire rotation. Consult an auto repair or tire professional to regularly perform tire rotations. At the least, schedule tire rotations every 6,000 to 8,000 miles for vehicle safety and tire quality.</p> /blog/view/is-it-time-for-a-tire-rotation/feed0Summer Heat http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/summer-heathttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/summer-heat#commentsWed, 23 Jul 2014 09:08:58 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/summer-heat<div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/172/SummerHeat2014.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; margin: 10px; float: right;" />Most of us know tires are one of the most important safety features of any vehicle and want to keep our tires in the best condition possible. However, what you do not know about tire wear and tire pressure could be damaging them the most. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Association, nearly 200 driving casualties per year occur at the hands of unmaintained tires. Right now it is estimated that 1 in 4 cars on the road are driving with underinflated tires.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> While summer is the season for vacations, cookouts, and water parks, it is also the season with torturous heat/weather conditions for tires. You can stay ahead of the heat this summer by keeping your tires in their optimum condition with these easy tips and checks. From the beginning, choose tires thoughtfully and always purchase in sets of 2 or 4. &nbsp;With proper balancing and alignment, the vehicle will perform more smoothly. Tire selection should be a careful process with knowledgeable technicians who understand all about your vehicle and the right tire size and loading ability and who also have the skill and equipment to properly balance your tires and align your vehicle.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Along with routine auto repair, tires should be serviced and inspected to ensure pressure and tread conditions are up to par. Tires lose around 1 psi (pound per square inch) of pressure each month, making routine check-ups imperative to the safety of any vehicle. If you are ever unsure as to what the tire pressure in your vehicle&rsquo;s tires should be, consult the manufacturer&rsquo;s air pressure guide notated on a sticker in the vehicle&rsquo;s door jam or inside the owner&rsquo;s manual.&nbsp;</div> <div> To help prevent uneven wear, tires should be rotated every 6,000 miles to ensure the longevity of your tires and vehicle. If tires are showing drastic uneven wear, consult a trusted technician to inspect for misalignment or other mechanical imbalance. Never drive a vehicle pulling to one side or that feels unbalanced. This can be dangerous and damaging to the vehicle.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Excessive heat can also cause worn or old tires to fail. For this reason it is important to check your tires more often in these warmer summer months. Check tire pressure before driving as tires heat up on the road and readings will be incorrect.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Finally, be aware of when you should replace tires completely. Driving tires after their intended lifespan, even if tread is not worn, is dangerous and can lead to dangerous tire failure. Stay ahead of the summer heat with these useful tire tips and prepare for the sunny skies to come!&nbsp;</div> /blog/view/summer-heat/feed0How Do Potholes Damage Your Vehicle? http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/how-do-potholes-damage-your-vehiclehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/how-do-potholes-damage-your-vehicle#commentsThu, 13 Mar 2014 13:24:34 -0400http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/how-do-potholes-damage-your-vehicle<div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/153/tire-repair.jpg" style="width: 282px; height: 192px; float: right; margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 20px;" />It&rsquo;s peak pothole season out there and no one is immune to their sneaky destruction. We&rsquo;ve all hit them at some point, and every time it happens, you see it only a second before it gets you, often too late to miss it. These little road hazards lay in wait, with their dips, bumps, and sharp toothy edges, just waiting to ruin your day. They can cause a sudden jolt all the way up to a blown tire. &nbsp;And, I hate to report, they aren&rsquo;t disappearing any time soon. Potholes are every tire&rsquo;s sworn enemies. Many of us are passionate about potholes, as we have personally sacrificed many hubcaps to them over the years.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> The way that potholes work is that roads will freeze and thaw causing erosion of the dirt beneath the pavement. &nbsp;This weakens the asphalt in the process. Add frequent traffic to the mix, and the road begins to crumble. Eventually, the street erodes even more and develops a crater we know as a pothole.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Potholes can cause many forms of damage to your vehicle:&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Tire puncture, damage or wear</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Wheel rim damage</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Premature wear on shocks and struts</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Suspension damage, including broken components</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Steering system misalignment</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Exhaust system damage</div> <div> &bull;<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Engine damage</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> The best ways to avoid pothole damage are to simply pay attention. &nbsp;Try to steer clear of them if you can. If it is possible simply swerve around them. This will help you avoid damage altogether. Leave space in front of you when you are driving. Doing so will help you spot potholes and give you enough time to avoid them.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Watch for water or other road hazards. Pay special attention to potholes filled with water, which can be especially dangerous, because you don&rsquo;t know their depth until it&rsquo;s too late. Remember to slow down especially if you are travelling on a pothole-filled road. Driving slowly can minimize the damage to your car if you hit a pothole.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;It is important not to slam the brakes. At some point, despite using the your best judgment and precaution, you might hit a pothole. To minimize damage, resist the urge to slam on the brakes. Hitting the brakes tilts the vehicle forward and puts extra stress on the front suspension, which is usually the first part of the vehicle to strike a pothole.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> If your vehicle hits a pothole and experiences a significant jolt, get it inspected immediately. This will prevent any further damage to your vehicle. If you continue to drive on minor problems they can start to compound, possibly resulting in major repairs down the road. Check your tires for uneven wear, or any bulges or visible damage, as this is often the first and most noticeable damage caused by potholes. Next, watch for any vibrations or the car pulling to the left or the right as this could mean that the pothole may have damaged your steering system or thrown your vehicle off alignment. Your wheels may need to be inspected or even balanced.&nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Don&rsquo;t hesitate to pull over and quickly check your tires to make sure you did not get a flat. Get your vehicle inspected as soon as possible depending on the size and impact of the pothole. Potholes are sneaky, and they are not harmless. If you have hit a pothole, come stop in and we&rsquo;ll help you assess the damage and get back on the road in no time.&nbsp;</div> /blog/view/how-do-potholes-damage-your-vehicle/feed0Website Launch Announcement: Tonnelle Tire Launches New Sitehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/website-launch-announcement-tonnelle-tire-launches-new-sitehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/website-launch-announcement-tonnelle-tire-launches-new-site#commentsTue, 11 Mar 2014 11:29:44 -0400TCShttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/website-launch-announcement-tonnelle-tire-launches-new-site<p> Tonnelle Tire is excited to announce the launch of its new website.&nbsp;The site features a fresh look, easy navigation and more focus on what the customer needs.</p> <p> The new site offers inventory listings with pictures and specs.&nbsp;You can search a variety of ways including by vehicle, brand and size.</p> <p> With the addition of our blog, we are able to help inform and educate our customers on important tire and service information.</p> <p> We invite you to visit the new <a href="http://tonnelletire.com/">tonnelletire.com</a> today.</p> /blog/view/website-launch-announcement-tonnelle-tire-launches-new-site/feed0Determining the Age of a Tirehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/determining-the-age-of-a-tirehttp://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/determining-the-age-of-a-tire#commentsFri, 14 Feb 2014 09:00:49 -0500http://tonnelletire.com/blog/view/determining-the-age-of-a-tire<div> <img alt="" src="http://tonnelletire.com/images/display/62/tireage.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 286px; border-width: 0px; border-style: solid; margin: 5px 10px; float: right;" />When it comes to determining the age of a tire, it is easiest to identify when the tire was manufactured by reading its Tire Identification Number (often referred to as the tire&rsquo;s serial number or DOT number). Unlike vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and the serial numbers used on many other consumer goods (which identify one specific item), Tire Identification Numbers are really batch codes that identify several components.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires that Tire Identification Numbers be a combination of the letters DOT, followed by ten, eleven or twelve letters or numbers that identify the manufacturing location, tire size and manufacturer&#39;s code, along with the week and year the tire was manufactured.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <strong>Tires Manufactured Since 2000</strong>- &nbsp;Since the year 2000, the week and year the tire was produced has been provided by the last four digits of the Tire Identification Number. &nbsp;Of those last four digits, the first two identify the week of the year that the tire was made while the last two identify the year itself.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> Here is an example of a tire manufactured since 2000 with the current Tire Identification Number format:</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> DOT U2LL LMLR 5109 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> 51 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Manufactured during the 51st week of the year</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> 09 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Manufactured during 2009</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> While the entire Tire Identification Number is required to be branded onto one sidewall of every tire, current regulations also require that DOT and the first digits of the Tire Identification Number must also be branded onto the opposite sidewall. Therefore, it is possible to see a Tire Identification Number that appears incomplete and requires looking at the tire&rsquo;s other sidewall to find the entire Tire Identification Number.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <strong>Tires Manufactured Before 2000</strong>- The Tire Identification Number for tires produced before the year 2000 was based on the assumption that tires would not be in service for ten years. While they were required to provide the same information as today&rsquo;s tires, the week and year the tire was produced was contained in the last three digits. The 2 digits used to identify the week a tire was manufactured immediately preceded a single digit used to identify the year.</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> An example of a tire manufactured before 2000 with the earlier Tire Identification Number format:</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> DOT EJ8J DFM 328 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> 32 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Manufactured during the 32nd week of the year</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> 8 <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>Manufactured during the 8th year of the decade- i.e. 1998</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> While the previous Tire Identification Number format identified that a tire was built in the 8th year of a decade, there was no universal identifier that confirmed which decade (tires manufactured in the 1990s may have a small triangle following the Tire Identification Number to identify the decade).</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> When in doubt, you can also check your records or receipts. Most tire manufacturer&#39;s warranties cover their tires for four to five years from the date of purchase or five years from the week the tires were manufactured (This can and may differ from the different manufacturers). So if you purchase new tires that were manufactured exactly two years ago they will be covered for a total of six years (four years from the date of purchase) as long as you have your receipt. If you lose your receipt, your tires&#39; warranty coverage will usually end five years from the week the tire was produced.&nbsp;</div> /blog/view/determining-the-age-of-a-tire/feed0